Troup Consulting

We're Champions of diversity. It's good for society. It's great for business.

Check out our two week update on our @YouTube contest from Erik, our #SocialMedia Director!

(Source: troupconsulting.com)

Ladies and gentlemen, today we kick off our brand new YouTube video contest “Your Voice, Your Vote. It Matters.” Check out the official launch video below, starring our very own Social Media Director, Erik McIntyre.

For the official contest rules, visit our website:http://www.troupconsulting.com/blog

We can’t wait to see what you all have to say!

knowhomo:

Happy Mother’s Day Weekend to all the mothers that love us for who we are and to all those who are learning that we are still the same person.

knowhomo:

Happy Mother’s Day Weekend to all the mothers that love us for who we are and to all those who are learning that we are still the same person.

Icebreakers! Great way to kick off a meeting or company retreat. 
knowhomo:

GLSEN’S ICEBREAKERS
(read more HERE)
1) Common Ground - Source: Kerry Ashforth
Students and faculty advisors stand in a circle. One person begins by saying, “I’ve got a younger sister,” or some other statement that is true for them. Everyone for whom this is also true steps into the center of the circle. Everyone who doesn’t have a younger sister stays on the outside. You can always choose not to step into the circle. The game often brings up personal and important issues that students may not want to discuss in a more formal setting. This also allows us to recognize our differences and similarities.
2) Gender Stereotypes - Source: Various
Trace a male and a female body on butcher paper, then have a free-for-all where everyone writes/expresses as many gender stereotypes as they can think of, and place those stereotypes on the bodies where they would apply (i.e. “boys are smart at math” would be placed on the head of the male body). From here, you can talk about how gender stereotypes and traits relate to perceptions about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people - as well as how these stereotypes limit our possibilities, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. These exercises can also be done using stereotypes of gay men and lesbians - helping us to recognize that everyone has different traits that don’t define our sexual orientation or gender.
3) Culture Walk - Source: Kerry Ashforth
There are one or two mediators, and they begin by asking a group of people, for example, women, to move to one side of the room. The people who then haven’t identified as women ask questions, and the women give them answers. Then the women get to say what they’d like other people to know about them. You don’t have to “talk” or “walk”.
4) Pretzel, Knots - Source: various.
Group building cooperation game. Everyone stands in a circle. Everyone puts his right hand forward into the middle and grabs the right hand of someone. Then, take your left and hand grab the left hand of someone else in the circle. Thus, with your right hand you are attached to one person’s right hand, and your left hand is attached to someone else’s left hand. You are all now in a tangled ring of bodies. Without letting go, untangle yourselves. You may switch positions of your hands, but do not break the ring.
Sometimes the group is tangled in one big loop, but sometimes it is tangled in several smaller ones.

Icebreakers! Great way to kick off a meeting or company retreat. 

knowhomo:

GLSEN’S ICEBREAKERS

(read more HERE)

1) Common Ground - Source: Kerry Ashforth

Students and faculty advisors stand in a circle. One person begins by saying, “I’ve got a younger sister,” or some other statement that is true for them. Everyone for whom this is also true steps into the center of the circle. Everyone who doesn’t have a younger sister stays on the outside. You can always choose not to step into the circle. The game often brings up personal and important issues that students may not want to discuss in a more formal setting. This also allows us to recognize our differences and similarities.

2) Gender Stereotypes - Source: Various

Trace a male and a female body on butcher paper, then have a free-for-all where everyone writes/expresses as many gender stereotypes as they can think of, and place those stereotypes on the bodies where they would apply (i.e. “boys are smart at math” would be placed on the head of the male body). From here, you can talk about how gender stereotypes and traits relate to perceptions about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people - as well as how these stereotypes limit our possibilities, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. These exercises can also be done using stereotypes of gay men and lesbians - helping us to recognize that everyone has different traits that don’t define our sexual orientation or gender.

3) Culture Walk - Source: Kerry Ashforth

There are one or two mediators, and they begin by asking a group of people, for example, women, to move to one side of the room. The people who then haven’t identified as women ask questions, and the women give them answers. Then the women get to say what they’d like other people to know about them. You don’t have to “talk” or “walk”.

4) Pretzel, Knots - Source: various.

Group building cooperation game. Everyone stands in a circle. Everyone puts his right hand forward into the middle and grabs the right hand of someone. Then, take your left and hand grab the left hand of someone else in the circle. Thus, with your right hand you are attached to one person’s right hand, and your left hand is attached to someone else’s left hand. You are all now in a tangled ring of bodies. Without letting go, untangle yourselves. You may switch positions of your hands, but do not break the ring.

Sometimes the group is tangled in one big loop, but sometimes it is tangled in several smaller ones.

Great words. 
knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Quotes and Quips
You are exactly who you are supposed to be.

Great words. 

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Quotes and Quips

You are exactly who you are supposed to be.

knowhomo:

PFLAG’S:
What Can I Do to Make My
School Safe for LGBT Youth?



Here are 5 ways you can make your school safer for LGBT students no matter what your role:
If you’re a student:
Doing nothing can be worse than the act itself: Report harassment, bullying, or threats targeted at LGBT students to a trusted teacher or advisor.
Encourage your teachers to address homophobia and transphobia in the classroom by posting safe-space posters, stopping hate speech, and supporting gay-straight alliances (GSAs).
Watch what you say: Don’t use words associated with being LGBT as euphemisms for stupid and explain to friends and peers who do why they shouldn’t.
Ask your school to address LGBT issues by having a Pride Week, bringing a speaker to your school, and talking about sexual orientation and gender identity in class.
Support your LGBT peers by joining a GSA: the A stands for ally.
If you’re a teacher:
Stop hate speech in your classroom. Speak out if you hear a student in your class or in the halls using words like “fag”, “dyke”, or “gay” as put-downs or insults.
Ask your administrator for the opportunity to attend “Respect for All” training for diversity and LGBT issues.
Participate in educators’ conferences, and speak to current and future teachers about being allies for LGBT staff and students.
Post safe-space posters, materials, or just talk to your students about why your classroom a safe-space, free of harassment, bias, and violence.
Support gay-straight alliances, chaperon LGBT positive proms, and help LGBT students and staff advocate for fair school policies.
If you’re an administrator or guidance counselor:
Reach out to both parents and students to help make them aware that peers may be struggling with sexual orientation or gender identity.
Meet with teachers and parents to help them learn about the issues that their students, children, or their children’s peers may be facing as a LGBT person.
Make sure your library, school healthcare workers, and health teachers include accurate information about gender identity, LGBT sexuality, and health.
Ensure that the NYC DOE’s “Respect for All” program and the Chancellor’s Regulation on Bias-Related Harassment and Bullying are known in your school, and that students, parents, and teachers know how to respond to bias incidents.
Let students know that your office is open to them, should they need support speaking about bullying, violence, harassment, or conflict at home.
If you’re a parent:
Understand the issues and terms associated with LGBT issues, and teach your children what you learn.
Talk to your kids about hate speech, bullying, and acceptance. Let them know that not participating in these activities, and standing up for others, earns your respect.
Work with your PTA to create allied groups in your community, focused on making your school safer.
Write to local papers and contact your school administrators to make it known that your family and your community are concerned about safe school issues.
Let your children know that you accept them, their friends, and their peers, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Make your home a supportive and open space.
(image from University of New Mexico)

knowhomo:

PFLAG’S:

What Can I Do to Make My

School Safe for LGBT Youth?

Here are 5 ways you can make your school safer for LGBT students no matter what your role:

If you’re a student:

  • Doing nothing can be worse than the act itself: Report harassment, bullying, or threats targeted at LGBT students to a trusted teacher or advisor.
  • Encourage your teachers to address homophobia and transphobia in the classroom by posting safe-space posters, stopping hate speech, and supporting gay-straight alliances (GSAs).
  • Watch what you say: Don’t use words associated with being LGBT as euphemisms for stupid and explain to friends and peers who do why they shouldn’t.
  • Ask your school to address LGBT issues by having a Pride Week, bringing a speaker to your school, and talking about sexual orientation and gender identity in class.
  • Support your LGBT peers by joining a GSA: the A stands for ally.

If you’re a teacher:

  • Stop hate speech in your classroom. Speak out if you hear a student in your class or in the halls using words like “fag”, “dyke”, or “gay” as put-downs or insults.
  • Ask your administrator for the opportunity to attend “Respect for All” training for diversity and LGBT issues.
  • Participate in educators’ conferences, and speak to current and future teachers about being allies for LGBT staff and students.
  • Post safe-space posters, materials, or just talk to your students about why your classroom a safe-space, free of harassment, bias, and violence.
  • Support gay-straight alliances, chaperon LGBT positive proms, and help LGBT students and staff advocate for fair school policies.

If you’re an administrator or guidance counselor:

  • Reach out to both parents and students to help make them aware that peers may be struggling with sexual orientation or gender identity.
  • Meet with teachers and parents to help them learn about the issues that their students, children, or their children’s peers may be facing as a LGBT person.
  • Make sure your library, school healthcare workers, and health teachers include accurate information about gender identity, LGBT sexuality, and health.
  • Ensure that the NYC DOE’s “Respect for All” program and the Chancellor’s Regulation on Bias-Related Harassment and Bullying are known in your school, and that students, parents, and teachers know how to respond to bias incidents.
  • Let students know that your office is open to them, should they need support speaking about bullying, violence, harassment, or conflict at home.

If you’re a parent:

  • Understand the issues and terms associated with LGBT issues, and teach your children what you learn.
  • Talk to your kids about hate speech, bullying, and acceptance. Let them know that not participating in these activities, and standing up for others, earns your respect.
  • Work with your PTA to create allied groups in your community, focused on making your school safer.
  • Write to local papers and contact your school administrators to make it known that your family and your community are concerned about safe school issues.
  • Let your children know that you accept them, their friends, and their peers, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Make your home a supportive and open space.

(image from University of New Mexico)